Training


Click here for more information about training seminars organised in the framework of the Civil Society Dialogue Network project.

Upcoming Training Courses given by EPLO Member Organisations

June 2022

TitlePower and powerlessness in peacebuilding
OrganiserforumZFD
Date1-29 June 2022
Locationonline
Short

description

Content

As people working to interrupt violence, transform conflict, and weave peaceful possibilities, we encounter power and powerlessness at every level of our work (and life), although we may not be habituated to notice or know what to do with these dynamics. Our awareness of and intentional engagement with power dynamics can shape our peacebuilding work toward balancing power, sharing power, and building power together and power within – rather than (unintentionally) replicating unjust, toxic, and/or oppressive power dynamics – in ourselves, our relationships, our projects, and our organizations.

This training is a four-week course that invites peacebuilding and conflict transformation practitioners to consider the questions: How do we experience power and powerlessness in peacebuilding? What does power have to do with identity, violence and peace? How does awareness (or its opposite, oblivion) about power shape the possibilities of our work/our integrity and privilege as peacebuilders? What can we do to break the patterns of misuse and abuse of power? How do we generate patterns of shared power and attend to power within?

Objectives

  • Consider definitions and experiences of power and powerlessness.
  • Deepen intersectional awareness of positionality, power, and privilege – by looking at our own biographies and experiences.
  • Imagine how to invite colleagues and communities into new patterns of power.

Key concepts

  • power structures and dynamics
  • identity, violence and peace
  • abuses and misuses of power
  • privileges
  • systemic racism, sexism, ableism, colonial and hierarchical practices
Useful

links

For more information please click here.
TitlePeacebuilding & Institutional Reform
Organiserswisspeace
Date1-29 June 2022
Locationonline
Short

description

Can institutional reform contribute to sustainable peace in countries emerging from violent conflict?

Constitutional reviews, decentralization, and electoral system change are reforms common to most peace processes. As sites for political contestation, these reforms often (re)define the “rules of the game” for years to follow. The international community mobilizes them to strengthen legitimate state institutions and good governance in conflict-affected contexts. While this international support often has an “all good things go together” rationale, experiences show that reform processes face many hurdles. Furthermore, they do not necessarily produce satisfactory outcomes.

Going beyond a purely technical understanding, this course views reform as a deeply political intervention transforming the socio-economic and political setup of a country; as such, it introduces a Political Economy Analysis (PEA) approach to analyzing reforms. Drawing on conceptual, policy, and practice trends, the course explores opportunities and risks institutional reform may pose to peacebuilding in highly polarized contexts.

Useful

links

For more information please click here.
TitleDigital Peacebuilding in Theory & Practice
Organiserswisspeace
Date22 – 24 June 2022
29 June – 01 July 2022
Locationonline
Short

description

Digital technology brings opportunities and challenges to peacebuilding. These include digital tools, digital spaces where conflict and peacebuilding can happen, and the ways these are both democratized and weaponized. This course does not aim to transform all peacebuilders into technical specialists, but rather, to encourage you to engage with this increasingly essential part of the peacebuilding landscape.

In this course, participants will learn how to assess what digital technology is needed in peace programming. We will look at digital conflict drivers and how digital technologies are part of conflict contexts. We will also discuss policy recommendations and what is coming next to this evolving field. This course emphasizes applied learning. Working on case studies from several regions and contexts, participants will conceptualize and receive feedback on various types of digital peacebuilding research, projects, and project components.

Useful

links

For more information please click here.

September 2022

TitleGender in Peace and Conflict
OrganiserforumZFD
Date6 September – 25 October 2022
Locationonline
Short

description

Content

How do gender and other intersecting identities relate to peace, conflict and violence? How can they offer insight into deeper layers of conflicts and inform alternatives to promote conflict transformation, justice, healing, and structural change?

This course aims at providing participants with resources to understand the role of gender and other intersecting identities in peace and conflict, and to work with them in a transformative manner. It begins with an overview of the main perspectives in the fields of gender and peace and conflict studies. It investigates intersectional identities, exploring vulnerability and power in difference and belonging. This exploration is based on the discussion of academic and non-academic texts, videos and artistic creations and intend to draw from participants’ personal and professional experiences in dialogue with case studies. Finally, it aims at providing participants with resources for working with gender and intersecting identities creatively and critically in their personal and professional lives, allowing identification of new courses of action in their own context, and contributing to the dynamic balance of the conflictive system in which they find themselves in.

Objectives

  • To understand the main theoretical discussions in gender and peace and conflict studies.
  • To investigate intersectionality and to explore dynamics of vulnerability and power in the processes of belonging and difference.
  • To explore self-reflection and analysis of one’s own positionality in the conflictive context considering gender dynamics.
  • To explore analysis of conflict through gender perspectives in case studies, including interpersonal, communitarian and organizational settings.
  • To practice identifying new courses of action to contribute to transformation.

Key Concepts

  • Gender
  • Peace
  • Conflict transformation
  • Intersectionality
Useful

links

For more information please click here.
TitleDigital Peacebuilding
OrganiserforumZFD
Date19 September – 7 November
Locationonline
Short

description

Content

Recent developments in digital technologies are increasingly impacting on conflicts globally. Digital tools play an evolving role in violent conflicts and their strategic and tactical use poses a challenge to peace, justice, and social cohesion. At the same time developments in digital technologies offer peacebuilders and conflict transformation practitioners new and exciting ways to address these very dynamics, overcome these threats, and shift the power to more locally owned peacebuilding agendas.

This seminar will assess how digital technologies impact conflicts and how peacebuilders can respond to these new challenges. Building on the initial analysis of key threats when digital technologies are weaponized, participants will explore the immense potential that these technologies bring to the peacebuilding field. From improved, more inclusive, and timely conflict analysis processes to capacity development in times of lockdown and shrinking spaces for civil society; from building online communities of peacebuilders to participatory documentation of human rights abuses; from intergenerational work around land and resource conflicts to mass mobilization and social justice campaigning – the possibilities are endless. The course will look at concrete examples where digital technologies have been used for conflict transformation and peacebuilding work – often developed in the Global South, with limited resources, and according to the needs. Exploring these concrete examples more in depth will allow participants to draw out key lessons for their own work. By the end of the seminar, each participant will be able to design a simple piece of digital peacebuilding and share it with the others for feedback and comparative learning.

Objectives

By the end of the seven weeks online course participants will…

  • …have a sound understanding why digital peacebuilding is an essential component of any conflict transformation and peacebuilding approach in the early 21st century.
  • …have explored the potential digital peacebuilding concepts offer in an environment of shrinking spaces for constructive civil society engagement, online misinformation, and Covid19 lockdowns.
  • …have been introduced to concrete examples of what digital peacebuilding can look like and learned about their pros and cons.
  • …have explored simple first steps to move conflict transformation and peacebuilding online and know about free/cost-effective resources that can help them to get started.
  • …have developed their own concrete intervention using digital technologies.

Key concepts (3-5 bullet points)

  • Digital approaches in conflict analysis and early warning
  • Digital approaches in conflict transformation, training, and campaign work
  • Live online, remote online, and hybrid formats to meet various needs
Useful

links

For more information please click here.

October 2022

TitleIntensive Course on Transitional Justice, Violent Conflict, and Sustainable Peace
OrganiserInternational Center for Transitional Justice
Date3 – 7 October
LocationBarcelona, Spain
Short

description

Content

The International Center for Transitional Justice and the Barcelona International Peace Centre (BIPC) are pleased to announce its return to in-person courses in Barcelona, Spain. Apply for our Intensive Course on Transitional Justice, Violent Conflict, and Sustainable Peace to be held on October 3-7, 2022.

Societies that experience violent conflict often face the immense challenge of confronting the legacies of serious and massive human rights violations that were committed as part of that conflict. Transitional justice is an approach to addressing these legacies, one that aims to break cycles of violence and lay the foundations for peace by dealing with the causes and consequences of abuse. At its most effective, transitional justice is a flexible but always victim-centered approach to fostering acknowledgment, redress, accountability, and prevention through innovative, locally driven interventions that contribute to sustainable peace.

Periods of transition from war to peace offer important opportunities to come to terms with past injustice, as armed combat comes to an end, new political and governance arrangements are established, and spaces open up for people and communities to come together and reflect on what happened. But societies do not wait for peace agreements in order to start confronting human rights violations. Experiences in countries such as Colombia, Syria, and most recently Ukraine, for example, demonstrate that efforts to document crimes, prioritize victims’ rights, and even provide limited redress and accountability often begin in the immediate aftermath of the wrongs themselves.

When countries enter the political negotiations and broader peace processes that seek to end violent conflict, addressing past violations is almost always on the agenda, as in countries such as Guatemala, South Africa, El Salvador, and Sierra Leone, and currently in Libya, South Sudan, Syria, Venezuela, and Yemen. While the issue is often among the most complex and controversial elements of negotiations, addressing victims’ needs, perspectives, and justice claims is key to ensuring the credibility and legitimacy of subsequent peace agreements, which, in turn, can shape the trajectory of future transitional justice.

During and after transitions to peace, confronting past abuses can then become an important element of peacebuilding. Not only can transitional justice help to avoid the recurrence of human rights violations, it can also contribute to the prevention of violence and violent conflict. In addition to measures that are explicitly understood as guarantees of nonrecurrence, the broader preventive potential of transitional justice lies largely in its capacity to address common drivers of violence and abuse, such as exclusion and its associated grievances and the fragility and illegitimacy of institutions. Ultimately, this is a long-term process that often continues for years and even decades.

This intensive course from ICTJ examines the entirety of the relationship between transitional justice, violent conflict, and sustainable peace. This includes the nature of justice claims and initiatives while conflict is ongoing, the dynamics of addressing past abuses during peace negotiations and processes, and the contributions of addressing the past to prevention and peacebuilding in the aftermath of war. The focus of the course allows for an exploration of the processes and objectives of transitional justice, the continued evolution of the field and its role in different contexts, and its strategic value as a policy tool in the sustainable peace and development agendas. The course will address the following questions:

  • What type of justice claims do victims, civil, society, and other actors make in contexts of ongoing or protracted violent conflict? What type of justice initiatives are possible in such contexts, given the political and security constraints of war
  • What are the potential impacts of such claims and initiatives? What are effective strategies/approaches?
  • How do peace negotiations and peace processes address the justice claims made by victims and other stakeholders? What are the challenges faced in addressing such claims? How does it affect the credibility and legitimacy of peace agreements? What are effective strategies/approaches? What are the effects on future transitional justice processes?
  • How do transitional justice processes contribute to avoiding the recurrence of human rights violations and preventing violence and violent conflict? What is the preventive capacity of different responses to past human rights violations, such as truth, memory, reparation, accountability, gender justice, and reform? What are the constraints on this capacity?
  • How can transitional justice be integrated into broader policy frameworks and agendas related to violent conflict, peace processes, and sustainable peace and development? What are the most relevant such frameworks? What are the most effective strategies for achieving such integration? What are the challenges to such integration?

The aim is to provide course participants with a firm grounding in transitional justice efforts and insight into the challenges and opportunities of helping to avoid the recurrence of human rights violations, violence, violent conflict, and authoritarianism.

Useful

links

For more information please click here.
TitleDealing with the Past
OrganiserforumZFD
Date12 October – 30 November
Locationonline
Short

description

Content

Among the most daunting challenges facing societies emerging from violent conflict is what to do with the gross violations of human rights committed during the conflict. History holds countless examples of societies that sought to ignore such atrocities only to be confronted by continual re-escalation. Long after a formal peace has been declared, victims especially may feel the impact of the war still raging – relentless in its demand for answers, in the damage caused, in the absence of acknowledgement, accountability, reparation, or even change. Dealing with the Past (DwP) comprises creative strategies capable of shifting this – it is about enabling social transformation and making comprehensive transition out of violence a reality.

The Organizing Tool for the seminar content is the Dealing with the Past Conceptual Framework, widely used in Germanophone Europe and in Germany’s multi- and bilateral cooperation abroad. Drawing on the Joinet-Orentlicher Principles, the Framework affirms four rights – the Right to Justice, the Right to Truth, the Right to Reparations, and Guarantees of Nonrecurrence – and sets them within a framework of conflict transformation. The training devotes a minimum of one full week to each of the four rights. It also introduces Conflict Transformation at the outset and then weaves it through the ensuing weeks, drawing on it as an access point to the complimentary fields of Restorative Justice and Reconciliation, as well as to civil society initiatives.

Objectives

  • To expose trainees to the challenges to peace that ensue from an episode of mass violence in which gross violations of human rights (GVHRs) have occurred and to introduce the concept of Conflict Transformation.
  • To establish trainees’ fluency in basic DwP theory – to each of the four rights in the DwP Framework as well as to the concepts of Restorative Justice and Reconciliation – and to grow their sensitivity to strategic dilemmas, using both illustration of emblematic cases and comparative analyses across contexts.
  • To expose participants to examples of civil society facilitated DwP initiatives.
  • To enable each trainee to build a DwP strategy for one contemporary situation.

Key Concepts

  • Dealing with the Past
  • Transitional Justice
  • Justice
  • Right to Know / Right to Truth
  • Reparations
  • Guarantees of Nonrecurrence
  • Gross violations of human rights
  • Victims
  • Restorative Justice
  • Reconciliation
Useful

links

For more information please click here.

Berghof Foundation ESSEC IRENÉ

(forumZFD is a member of EPLO member organisation German Platform for Peaceful Conflict Management)

Upcoming Training Courses given by Non-EPLO Member Organisations

There are currently no upcoming training courses by non-EPLO organisations to advertise. Please check this page regularly for future opportunities.